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==Annotated Bibliography Entry==
==Annotated Bibliography Entry==
An easy way to get started adding to a study guide is be contributing an annotated bibliography entry. Simply, this is using a template to add a secondary resource to a bibliography, followed by a couple of sentences that explain the significance of the resource. Bibliographies are staples of scholarly writing and give researchers a list of resources. Bibliography entries are organized alphabetically by '''author’s last name'''.
An easy way to get started adding to a study guide is be contributing an annotated bibliography entry. Simply, this is using a template to add a secondary resource to a bibliography, followed by a couple of sentences that explain the significance of the resource. Bibliographies are staples of scholarly writing and give researchers a list of resources. Annotated bibliographies should be subpages of the study guides (e.g. ''Odyssey''/Bibliography) and bibliography entries are organized alphabetically by '''author’s last name'''.


First, locate a '''strong secondary source''',{{refn|See [[w:Wikipedia:Reliable sources|Wikipedia:Reliable sources]] for a thorough discussion about choosing reliable sources for research. Essentially, you should keep your sources to '''scholarly printed material''': books and journals. Occasionally web resources will work, like reviews and essays in magazines and newspapers and the infrequent web site, but mostly you will want to stick to those items you find in a library. Physically going to the library is the best way to uncover excellent sources, but increasingly full-text resources are available via university libraries. Either way, introduce yourself to a librarian to get the best sources.}} usually a book or an article from a scholarly journal—your university library is a big help here. Get the article and read it, taking notes as you go. Try to identify the critic’s main point(s) and write it in your own words. Once you have read the article, you are ready to write your bibliographic entry.
First, locate a '''strong secondary source''',{{refn|See [[w:Wikipedia:Reliable sources|Wikipedia:Reliable sources]] for a thorough discussion about choosing reliable sources for research. Essentially, you should keep your sources to '''scholarly printed material''': books and journals. Occasionally web resources will work, like reviews and essays in magazines and newspapers and the infrequent web site, but mostly you will want to stick to those items you find in a library. Physically going to the library is the best way to uncover excellent sources, but increasingly full-text resources are available via university libraries. Either way, introduce yourself to a librarian to get the best sources.}} usually a book or an article from a scholarly journal—your university library is a big help here. Get the article and read it, taking notes as you go. Try to identify the critic’s main point(s) and write it in your own words. Once you have read the article, you are ready to write your bibliographic entry.
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This example is fairly lengthy—most will be half this length. Also note that the writer includes parenthetical citations that reference specific pages for the source, a nice way to help out researchers. Remember, the idea behind an annotated bibliography is to help out researchers as much as possible, so detail and accuracy are paramount.
This example is fairly lengthy—most will be half this length. Also note that the writer includes parenthetical citations that reference specific pages for the source, a nice way to help out researchers. Remember, the idea behind an annotated bibliography is to help out researchers as much as possible, so detail and accuracy are paramount.
==Literary Term==
==Character Sketch==
==Theme Explanation==
==Symbol/Metaphor Analysis==
==Historical Context==
==Critical Reaction==
==Content Expansion and Revision==


====Notes====
====Notes====