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Complete annotated bib entry.
(Created page. More to do.)
 
(Complete annotated bib entry.)
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These are the basic variables, but there are many more, if needed (see the [[w:Template:Cite book|book template]] for all of them). Simply paste the code on the wiki page in the appropriate location (alphabetically by author’s last name) and fill in the details. Once you have them filled in, click the “Show preview” button to see how it looks and if there are any errors.  
These are the basic variables, but there are many more, if needed (see the [[w:Template:Cite book|book template]] for all of them). Simply paste the code on the wiki page in the appropriate location (alphabetically by author’s last name) and fill in the details. Once you have them filled in, click the “Show preview” button to see how it looks and if there are any errors.  
Once you have the citation looking right, add a couple of sentences at the end that detail the main arguments of the source. The idea is to give readers an overview of the source in case they are interested in reading it for themselves. Here’s an example of an annotated bibliography entry:
{{refbegin|indent=yes}}
* {{cite journal |last1=Kaufmann |first1=Donald |date={{date|2007}} |title=''An American Dream'': The Singular Nightmare |url=https://prmlr.us/mr01kau |journal=The Mailer Review |volume=1 |issue=1 |pages=194–205 |access-date={{date|2021-08-02|ISO}} }}  Kaufmann reads ''AAD'' as, in Mailer's words, "in a funny way . . . a novel of manners" (202). These manners become a struggle between the institutionalized American Dream (195) and Rojack's internal and individual code (204). Kaufmann interprets ''AAD'' as a "singular nightmare" that reflects Rojack's relationship with the moon, or "magic, dread and perceptions of death as the center of motivation" (196; ''AAD'' 8). Rojack exists in his own dream world, and the narrative reflects this by juxtaposing "fantastic content with a realistic presentation" to illustrate the American ambiguity of the mass media: a lucidity verging on insanity (195) or where much is implied and little substantiated (201). Much of ''AAD'' remains implied, unsubstantiated, and inverted — like "what passes for paradise in America is really hell" (201, 200) — showing Rojack's relationships with white magic at the bottom (Cherry, Roberts, Deidre) and black that seems to have all the power (Kelly, Ganucci, Deborah) (199). ''AAD'' becomes a sort of medieval dream-allegory (199) where salvation remains an individual, inner condition where one survives only through "adherence to a code of relative manners" (204).
{{refend}}
This example is fairly lengthy—most will be half this length. Also note that the writer includes parenthetical citations that reference specific pages for the source, a nice way to help out researchers. Remember, the idea behind an annotated bibliography is to help out researchers as much as possible, so detail and accuracy are paramount.


====Notes====
====Notes====